2015    DE-HAIRING

 
Cashmere, Pygora, Cashgora,  Camel, Yak
Bison & Qiviut

IMPORTANT!  Pre-processing Information !!!!

 

Processing Prices *Less than 1 lb of "raw incoming" weight used in each individual run will be charged as 1 lb in the washing and dehairing process.*  

   

$6.00/lb for washing (using raw fiber weight) $8.00/lb for bison or qiviut

$50.00/lb (3.75/oz)  dehairing into clouds (using washed weight) cashmere, pygora, cashgora, yak, and camel

$65.00/lb (4.06/oz)  dehairing into clouds (using washed weight) qiviut,  bison

It is the discretion of the mill to add additional runs at $25.00/lb (1.56/oz) for  cashmere type, yak, and camel, and $32.00/lb (2.00/oz) for bison/qiviut, if your fiber is too short or guard hair is too fine causing poor separation of the down from the outer coat. 

Incoming fiber needs to be skirted properly before dehairing.  If there is too much vm or chunks of guard hair still left in after your skirting job, we will call you to give you the following choices:  1) send back to customer for re-skirting.. 2) we re-skirt at $25.00/hour. 3) we run thru dehairer "as is" at approximately double the runs/lb, costing you more money and a short stapled end product.

$17.00/lb for carding into rovings/batts (using dehaired weight) $15.00 if 50% is alpaca.

$10.00/lb additional fee will be added for blending the fibers together, plus purchase price of extra fiber if using mill fiber

Rovings = washing + dehairing + carding prices. Yarn = washing + dehairing + carding + yarn prices.

 

Please attach our ORDER FORM to your order.

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Shorn cashmere has a 20-30% return.

Combed cashmere has a 50-80% return.

Yak & Bison usually has a 30-50% return.

Photos taken at the National Bison Range in Montana.

Have Pet Fiber??? We can process it for you!

WE SORT AND PACKAGE YOUR DEHAIRED CLOUDS INTO THREE DIFFERENT CATEGORIES.  WE HAVE FOUND THIS TO BE AN ASSET FOR OUR CUSTOMERS, ESPECIALLY IN SALES.  KEEPING THE DIFFERENT LENGTHS SEPARATE HAS ALSO HELPED DECREASE THE SHEDDING AND PILLING OF THE YARN AFTER IT HAS BEEN KNITTED/CROCHETED INTO A GARMENT.

"PRIME": EXTREME EXCELLENCE WITH THE LONGEST STAPLE LENGHT AND DENSITY.

"FIRSTS":  RE-RUN FROM THE DROP BIN. IT HAS SMALL QUANTITIES OF FINE HAIR.

"SECONDS":  REMAINDER OF FIBER AFTER "FIRSTS" ARE REMOVED PLUS SHORT & FINE.

WASTE HAIR IS DISPOSED OF UNLESS "RETURN TO CUSTOMER IS REQUESTED"

IF SHIPPING MORE THAN ONE COLOR, DESIGNATE YOUR COLOR GROUP ON EACH BAG.

Shorn cashmere is exciting to dehair.  It is wonderful to see the difference between the first run and the final cashmere cloud!

Combed cashmere processing gives you the best yield/return. Shorn cashmere has extra waste weight due to the intermixed hair.  There is more loss of good fiber with shorn cashmere and a greater chance of noils after the multiple runs through the dehairer.

2010:  Our mill is proud to announce we are certified through the Olds College in Canada, as a Cashmere Classifier and Cashmere Fiber Judge

2009:  We have noticed more longer and finer guard hairs showing up in this year's cashmere as breeders are striving for the ulimate finer long downy undercoat.  This type of cashmere is harder to dehair.  The fine long outer coat does not want to let loose from the down during the dehairing process.  For the breeder this means more costly additional runs.  We do think we have found a way to more effectively process and cut down on the extra dehairing runs.  But this takes the effort on the breeder's behalf.  If the breeder would clip off the long guard hairs by hand before shearing or combing, this would save you more money and give you a better finished product.  "How?"... you ask..  It not only makes these long fine hairs shorter, but it also gives each individual hair two blunt ends.  The dual blunt ends are much easier for the dehairing machine to catch and separate. This will save you putting hard earned money out for those additional runs thru the dehairer plus cuts down the stress on the cashmere undercoat.

2008:  We have found some of the combed cashmere to noil on the second run through the dehairer.  Perhaps an over zealous comber could have jumped ahead of the shedding time for that animal; pulling and stretching the fiber more than usual during the removal off the goat. 

The combed fiber gives the livestock breeder more yield, but it also allows for a less superior end product unless it is carefully combed.  Again, the pulling and stretching during combing contributes to the advancement of noiling, even before approaching the dehairing process.  We have noticed pre-noiling in some of the raw combed fiber, not to mention the fine particles of VM intermingled in the fiber upon receiving the shipment at our mill.  VM is usually minimal in shorn cashmere as there are no teeth from a comb or slicker brush to drag it into the raw down.  So if we are seeing this correctly...please have a little patience to wait until the goat is fully ready to release it's undercoat and/or comb gently to prevent the extra trauma to the hair shafts.  This will help give you a product that shows "ultimate luxury" and highest yield. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Going to the Sun Fiber Mill 2007


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